CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 73% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider.
You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 73% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider.
You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

Expect volatility on sterling in tonight’s Brexit vote

As traders wait (seemingly patiently) for the key “meaningful vote” in Parliament on the Withdrawal Agreement it might be an idea to look at a few scenarios that could play out for sterling. Although sterling has been relatively settled in recent days, perhaps even strong, it could be a case of “buy on rumour, sell on fact” on the initial reaction, but would the sell-off then last? It could be a bumpy road from 1900GMT tonight (when the vote could first take place, although the number of amendments are likely to see this pushed back by several minutes).

Uncertainty

A loss is almost entirely nailed on (with the DUP saying that they will certainly vote against the deal), so it is all about the size of the loss. To win, the Government needs 318 votes, but any defeat of less than 50 votes would be considered as a workable loss for Mrs May where she could probably go back to Brussels and extract further concessions that would make the deal palatable for a victory in a second round. However, Sky News has totted the numbers and they do not look promising.

A huge loss (anything over 150 votes) looks likely, but would smash the deal out of the water. However, the actual size of the defeat may not be as bad as Sky are suggesting, as when push comes to shove, some of the harder Brexiteers on the Conservative Party benches may have a change of heart (I am saying a defeat of 150) and not vote against the Government.However, even then, this would still open all sorts of possible scenarios:

  • A Labour vote of confidence in the Government which could lead to a potential General Election (requiring an extension to Article 50).
  • A shift of stance from Mrs May when she updates the House within three days, with a plan B for a move to a far softer form of Brexit (Norway style EEA, which would also require an extension to Article 50 in order to renegotiate).
  • Complete political paralysis as Parliament takes over the process but also leading to an eventual extension of Article 50 as there is no majority in Parliament for a no deal Brexit.
  •  An eventual forced second referendum as all other avenues prove to be unsuccessful (again needing an extension to Article 50).
  • No deal Brexit – as the UK drops out on a technicality amid no agreement in Parliament.

It is interesting that the majority of these pathways involve an extension to Article 50. This is why sterling has rallied in recent days.

Therefore it is li